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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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Dispatch header 800 - 061217

August 28, 2018

More states join Bells of Peace Initiative 

Bells of Peace logo vertical

The Governors of Missouri, Illinois and Mississippi have joined the effort to promote Bells of Peace: A World War I Remembrance by issuing proclamations asking all their citizens to toll bells on November 11, 2018, in recognition of the centennial of the signing of the Armistice that ended the fighting in World War I. Bells of Peace is an initiative sponsored by the World War I Centennial Commission to commemorate the service and sacrifice of those who served in World War I, and all veterans. The Commission has called on all Americans everywhere to toll bells 21 times, at 5-second intervals, on November 11 at 11:00 a.m. local time. Read more about how you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.


Ceremony casts new light on nearly forgotten SF monument to WWI fallen

 

SF Memorial

There was a solemn ceremony at noon on Saturday, August 25 at Heroes Grove, the site of a nearly forgotten monument in Golden Gate Park, to honor 761 San Franciscans who died in the war to end all wars a century ago. The monument is an 18-ton granite stone carved with the names of 748 men and 13 women from San Francisco who died in World War I. The site, called the Grove of Heroes, is surrounded by redwood trees and reached by an unmarked trail near the park entrance at 10th Avenue and Fulton Street. “It is a very beautiful place, a quiet spot where you could come and reflect,” said retired Marine Corps Maj. Gen. J. Michael Myatt, chair of San Francisco’s World War I Centennial commemoration. Click here to read more about this historic monument and the recent ceremony.


Quincy, IL African-American physician who served in WWI was mover, shaker

African-American doctors

The Herald-Whig newspaper in Quincy, IL continued its fine World War I coverage recently with an in-depth profile of  Dr. Hosea J. Nichols, one of the 104 doctors of African-American descent who were physicians in World War I. His father, William Nichols, who had been born a slave, served with the Union Army in the 59th U.S. Colored Infantry during the Civil War. At the age of 47, Dr. Hosea Nichols volunteered for military service. He trained at Fort Des Moines, Iowa, which had been a cavalry training post but was converted to train African-American officers when the United States entered World War I. Click here to read more about Dr. Hosea Nichols' record of both military any civic service.


"Hello Girls" movie and medal effort both gaining public and political attention

Hello Girls

The "Hello Girls" movie previously profiled here in DISPATCH is moving into wider distribution across the nation. The film is embarking on whirlwind schedule of Film Festivals and screenings. According to the film's producer and director James Theres, Hello Girls has been accepted into the lineup of several major Film Festivals, to include the GI Film Festival in San Diego, as well as the Heartland International Film Festival in Indianapolis. Click here to read more about where the movie will be when over the coming months.

Hello Girls snip

Meanwhile, the bipartisan effort in the U.S. Congress to authorize a Gold Medal for the Hello Girls, previously described in DISPATCH here, is continuing to gain ground with new co-sponsors coming aboard. Recently the Task & Purpose military veterans web site published an in-depth article about the history of Hello Girls, their shabby treatment by the Army after the war ended, and why the Congressional medal is well-deserved recognition of the service of the Hello Girls. Click here to read the entire thoughtful article on the Task & Purpose site.


First US Naval Rail gun operational for final Allied counter-offensive of WWI

Rail gun

On August 18th, 1918, the U.S. Navy's first naval railway gun, a 14-inch, 50 caliber, Mark IV Navy gun mounted on a railway carriage, became operational in St. Nazaire, France during World War I. The guns were used to target key infrastructure deep behind the German lines, and scored some notable successes, including destroying a section of a moving supply train, ripping up an entire three-track line for a distance of some 100 yards, and scoring a direct hit on a German troop train with devastating results. Click here to read more about the big guns' contribution to the war effort, and where you can see one of the rail guns today.


The Liberation 1918-2018: "The reaction of the audience was overwhelming."

Belgium tour

An amazing WWI Living History event has been taking place this past week across Belgium. Called "The Liberation 1918-2018", the project consists of a column of dozens of WWI reenactors in period vehicles, wagons, costumes, uniforms, and equipment, who are trekking across Belgium, following the route of the final counter-offensive of the war. In Flanders Fields of September 1918 a massive campaign was launched by Belgian, British, Commonwealth, French and American forces against the German axis forces in a final effort to end the War of wars and liberate Belgium. To commemorate this final offensive, a historical multinational column embarked on an epic journey from Lo-Reninge to Deinze between 13 and 19 August 2018 -- stopping in several towns, at every memorial and battlefield to pay due homage to all of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our liberty. Click here to read an extensive interview with the leader of this unique living history event, Mr. David Moortgat, President, V.Z.W Platform for Belgian military history.


Innovative Cosmetic Surgery Restored WWI Vets' Ravaged Faces—And Lives

Plastic surgery snip

During and after World War I, the blue benches outside London’s Queen’s Hospital were reserved for soldiers who had suffered facial wounds on the Western Front that had never been seen before in warfare. Improvements in anesthesia and treating infections meant that these gruesome battlefield injuries had become survivable, but the facial wounds could be so severe that they left soldiers unable to eat, drink, or even speak. As terrible as other amputations were, the soldiers who lost their faces also lost their identities. But inside Queen’s Hospital, pioneering new techniques in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction, born of necessity, helped  provide some semblance of normal life to those with these terrible injuries.  Click here to read the entire History.com article on the surgeons' work, and how they helped create "hope instead of despair” for their patients.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Seth and Garrett Moore Interview

Moore Twins

In August 24th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 86, Host Theo Mayer spoke with Seth and Garrett Moore, nineteen year old twin brothers with an incredible passion for WW1, originally sparked by family history, when their great-grandmother told them about her uncle who went off to fight the Germans in 1917. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.

Observation Balloons 

Balloon

In August 24th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 86, WW1 Tech and Speaking WW1 shared a common theme: Observation Balloons, a crucial but frequently overlooked piece of World War I aviation technology.  Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

WW1 Centennial News Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Balloonatic jumping to safety

Highlights: #86
Airplanes to end the war? Some say.

Airplanes to end the war? Some say! | @ 02:05

Continued war just out of habit? - Mike Shuster | @ 13:10

Part 3: The 28th Division in Fismette - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 17:00

The American Legion and ACE - US WWI Commissioner Jack Monahan | @ 24:40

Video Game “11-11 Memories Retold” - Yoan Fanise | @ 30:00

19-year-old twin WWI reenactors - Seth & Garrett Moore | @ 37:45

WW1 War Tech: Observation Balloons | @ 43:45

Speaking WWI: Balloonatic | @ 47:00

Articles & Posts: From the Dispatch Newsletter | @ 48:05 

The Buzz: Social Media Highlights - Katherine Akey | @ 50:45


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Heroes' Grove: Remembering and Forgetting the Great War in Germany

After war, how does a country commemorate its soldiers in the shadow of defeat and shame?  David Eisler explores the question this week at WWrite by analyzing the evolution of a war cemetery in Germany’s Rhein-Neckar Valley. Eisler, a U.S. Army veteran whose writing has appeared in The New York Times,War on the RocksThe Daily Beast, Collier’s Magazine, Military Review,Drunken Boat, and the anthology of short fiction, The Road Ahead: Fiction from the Forever War, is a PhD candidate at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies in Heidelberg, Germany. His doctoral dissertation focuses on the relationship between American civil-military relations and contemporary war fiction from Vietnam to Iraq and Afghanistan. Read this eloquent, perceptive post about remembering and forgetting Germany's WWI dead.


Doughboy MIA for week of August 27

Private George J. McDonald

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private George J. McDonald.  George McDonald was born June 8th, 1991 in Shoals, Indiana. He was a laborer when he was called into service on October 6th, 1917 and sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training. He went ‘Over There’ on April 7th, 1918, and was assigned to Company G, 28th Infantry, 1st Division. He was lost during the Battle of Soissons; initially being listed as Missing in Action and that status later being changed to Killed in Action, though his remains were never located. His case remains a mystery. 

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandises

Pritzker Book

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

 

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force.  Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


John William Tarter 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

John William Tarter

 

Submitted by: T.J. Cullinane, community historian

John William Tarter born around 1895, John Tarter served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

John William Tarter was a soldier of the Great War who was felled by disease rather than German bombs and bullets.

He was born in Hartline, Washington on April 3, 1895 to Joseph Henry Tarter (1862 – 1925) and the former Nancy Ann Epperley (1864 – 1945). Hartline is a small town in Grant County located in central Washington. Tarter had four siblings: Joseph Clinton Tarter, Bonnie B. Tarter Neal (1886 – 1983), Maude D. Tarter Zetty (1890 – 1979), and Lonnie Clinton (1893 – 1966).

From John’s draft registration card, we learn that was tall with a medium build and had blue eyes and dark brown hair. When the United States entered the war in 1917, John was employed as a miner with the Federal Mining and Smelting Company in neighboring Shoshone County, Idaho.

Read John William Tarter's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 21, 2018

"We can live in freedom but the price was very high. It is our duty to commemorate their sacrifice. " 

Stassen-Burnworth

Peter Stassen and his family are remarkable people, who are carrying out a very honorable pursuit. This Flemish family has volunteered to be part of an 'Adopt A Grave' program at the Flanders Field American Cemetery, administered by the American Legion. Flanders Field is a true 'battlefield cemetery', and the area surrounding the site saw intense fighting during the autumn of 1918. Now, however, Flanders Field Cemetery is a place of peace, and contemplation, managed by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC). Most of the 368 military graves there are from this battle. Mr. Stassen is, himself, a retired military member, so he knows a little about service and sacrifice. We spoke to him about his experiences, and his family's efforts to commemorate our American WWI hero.


Symbolic & Powerful Poppy Art at National WWI Museum and Memorial

 

Poppies at NWWIM&M

During the course of World War I, approximately 117,000 American soldiers lost their lives in defense of the United States and its allies. As the centennial of the Armistice of World War I approaches, the National WWI Museum and Memorial and artist Ada Koch honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice with a moving and powerful art installation. Reflections of Hope: Armistice 1918 features 117 intricate metal poppy sculptures designed by Koch in a symbolic arrangement in the Reflection Pool at the Museum and Memorial. Each poppy represents 1,000 American soldiers killed during the Great War. Click here to read more about how this installation uses the powerful symbolism of the poppy to commemorate American service men and women who lost their lives in World War I.


#AMIENS100 Student Battlefield Tour Diary is now available online

Le Hamel

In August 2018, students from Australia, Canada, France, the UK and the United States came together to tour the former WWI battlefields, as part of the commemoration of the centennial of the war in Amiens, France. Two groups of students came from the U.S., sponsored with help from the US World War I Centennial Commission and the National WWI Museum and Memorial, as part of their joint Education programs. Read more here about the students' expedition, and what they felt about the value of understanding World War I for students today.


From the Battlefields of World War I: Lessons on Franco-American Relations and the Centuries-Old Military Alliance

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery

The Meridian International Center explored the question of what lessons can be gleaned from the Franco-American relationship that stems back over 250 years during a summer delegation to France that brought U.S. National Guard officials and American diplomats together with French military and political leaders in commemoration of the Second Battle of the Marne, the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. Meridian partnered with the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission to host 40 leaders including high-ranking U.S. National Guard and French generals, World War I military historians, French senators and mayors, and WWI Centennial Commissioners. Read more here about this gathering and discussion.


"We share a bond with our forefathers – the Soldiers who came before us."

Bayonet training

In a powerful and pointed article on the U.S. Army Reserve web site entitled "Why World War I Matters," Major Frank Huffman of the U.S. Army Reserve Command talks directly to his fellow soldiers about the "13,484 reasons World War I matters to today’s Army Reserve Soldier. That is the number of Americans killed in action “Over There,” along with another 52,721 who were wounded in the fight."  Click here to read the entire thoughtful article about the profound debt owed by today's soldiers to their World War I forbears.


Cousins Reunited: How the World War I U.S. Occupation of Germany Still Reverberates a Century Later

Cousins reunited

The clues were in a faded, tattered black-and-white photograph that Johannes Heibel’s father carried with him everywhere. Nearly 100 years after it was taken in a German village, the photo shed light on a family secret that connected Heibel to a cousin he had never known in faraway Tennessee. In this centennial year marking the end of World War I, the discovery illuminates a postwar occupation of Germany that most Americans have never heard of: A quarter-million U.S. troops held some 2,500 square miles of Rhineland for four years after the November 1918 armistice that ended the fighting. Click here to read the entire article about how distant cousins an ocean apart were led to find each other.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Devil's Rope

Episode #85
Highlights: 1.5 Million "Over There"

100 years ago: Ready to increase US forces to 4 million | @ 02:10

German perspective on the turn around - Mike Shuster | @ 12:25

Part 2: 28th division - the Pennsylvania Doughboys - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 16:30

Announcing resources for local Armistice Centennial Events - YourACE | @ 23:15

Spotlight on the media: The Hello Girls - Jim Theres | @ 29:50

Update from the States: Wyoming and Indian Doughboys - Douglas R. Cubbison | @ 37:00

WWI WarTech - Devil’s Rope | @ 44:45

Dispatch Newsletter Highlights | @ 47:50 

BUZZ - Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 49:55


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

The Debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans, Part 2: Jean Moulin

This post is the second in a WWrite series on the debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans. 

Last week, the blog featured resister Albert Camus and the influence of his father, a WWI soldier who died at the Battle of the Marne. 

This week, WWrite explores the most famous French Resistance icon, Jean Moulin. One of France's most celebrated WWII heroes began his fight in WWI as a soldier and an artist. 

The experience, which he discusses in his book, First Combat, shaped his rise as the leader of France's Resistance Army, also known as the "Army of Shadows." Read the inspiring story of Moulin's voyage across two world wars at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of August 20

Private John T. Miller

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private John T. Miller. Born on October 4th, 1897, John Miller enlisted in the regular US Army on June 16th, 1916 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He was assigned to the medical department and transferred to Ft. Bliss, Texas. From there he served on the border with Company C, 2st Provisional Field Hospital at El Paso, Texas. He went overseas with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917, where he was assigned to the medical detachment of the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, 1st Division. He was killed in action at Chateau Thierry on July 19th, 1918. Buried on the battlefield, his grave was never located.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Charm Pendant

Charm Pendant

Proudly wearing the WWI 100 Years charm pendant is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago. This satin nickel charm, worn on a necklace or bracelet, is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols


Submitted by:
Alan Leventhal, Tribal Ethnohistorian, Muwekma Ohlone Tribe
 

Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols was born around 1895. Henry Nichols served in World War 1 with the United States Navy. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

Henry Nichols was born in Niles on February 12, 1895 to Charles Nichols and Muwekma Ohlone Susanna Flores Nichols.

Henry enlisted on May 23, 1917 and first served on the USS Albatross. By December 31, 1917 he was transferred to the Battleship USS Arizona, and later on March 26, 1918 he was transferred again to the Battleship USS Oklahoma.

During World War I Henry Nichols served in the North Atlantic and was on escort duty in December 1918 when the Oklahoma was serving as escort during President Woodrow Wilson's arrival in France at the end of the war (November 11, 1918). The Oklahoma returned to Brest, France on June 15, 1919 to escort home President Wilson who was transported on the USS George Washington from his second visit to France.

Read Henry Nichols' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 14, 2018 

Ceremony Honors American WWI Heroes at Flanders Field American Cemetery

Flandrs Field Ceremony

On August 5th, 2018, the U.S. Army Center for Military History, and the Army National Guard, conducted a remembrance ceremony at the Flanders Field American Cemetery in Belgium to honor America’s war dead from World War I. Several United States World War 1 Centennial Commission commissioners attended the event. Of the ceremony, General Kadavy said "It was overwhelming to host a memorial ceremony for our fallen Soldiers at Flanders Field American Cemetery. We owe it to those who have made the last full measure of devotion. Humbled by those who have led before us." Read more about this solemn and beautiful ceremony here.


Bells of Peace update: Maryland Governor Signs Proclamation for Bells to be Tolled 11/11 to Honor WWI Veterans

 

Governor Larry Hogan, Maryland

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan has issued a proclamation calling for bells to be tolled in Maryland on November 11, 2018 at 11:00 am in remembrance of veterans of World War I. The proclamation coincides with a call by the United States World War I Centennial Commission for all Americans to participate in a national tolling of bells. Read the entire Maryland Bells of Peace proclamation here. Want to know more about Bells of Peace taking place November 11, 2018?  Click here to find out how you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event.


Lost Purple Heart returned to family of World War I veteran 100 years later

Hish Purplke Heart frame

United States World War I Centennial Commission Veterans Service Organizations & Military Director David Hamon was on hand to assist last week as Purple Hearts Reunited presented the Purple Heart Medal earned by Private First Class Joseph Hish, who was wounded by mustard gas during World War I, to his son and grandson during a ceremony in Washington, DC. Read more about Purple Hearts Reunited and this moving ceremony here.


Massachusetts’ Mount Greylock added to National World War I Memorial Registry

Monahan at Mount Greylock

The Boston Globe newspaper has put the spotlight on one of the awardees in the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials program, sponsored by the United States World War I Centennial Commission  and and the Pritzker Military Museum & Library in Chicago. A shining light atop Mount Greylock, the state’s highest peak, the Massachusetts Veterans Memorial Tower received one of 100 grants to assist in refurbishing memorials during the WWI Centennial Commemoration in the United States. Read the entire Boston Globe article here. The local Berkshire Eagle newspaper also covered the award ceremony at the Mount Greylock Memorial which featured remarks by Commissioner Jack Monahan (left) and Colonel Jennifer Pritzker of PMML.  Read the entire Berkshire Eagle article here.  Though the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials competition has ended, the Commission is still looking for WWI Memorials across the nation to be listed in the US WW1 Memorial Register. Is there a WWI Memorial in your state, county, city, or local area that is not in the Register? You can add it to the Register through the Memorial Hunters Club--click here for more information.


"Nestled in the midst of the most devastating war in history sat a remarkable football team."

Doug Bigelow

Free-lance writer Doug Bigelow was perusing the historical newspaper files on microfiche in the local library in Oswego, NY years ago when he came across a photograph of the 1915 Oswego Shakespeares. "The what?" Doug (just like you) asked himself, but moved on to other things. Years later, another chance encounter led him back to a remarkable story of football on the Great Lakes during World War I. As America enters the 100th football season since World War I, Doug's book Gridiron On The Great Lake – The 1918 Fort Ontario Army Football Team offers a timely and fascinating look not only at "an unbeaten, unscored upon powerhouse" football team, but also how Americans and American sports managed and adjusted during the Great War. Click here to read more about how this book came to be written.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

An interview with Harley Davidson Archivist Bill Jackson

 

Harley enters Germany

In August 3rd's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 83, Bill Jackson, an archivist for Harley Davidson, joined host Theo Mayer to tell the story of this iconic company and its motorcycles in the Great War, including how the very first American to set foot on German soil on November 12 of 1918, the day after the Armistice, was a corporal named Roy Holtz of the US Army who actually entered Germany riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle and sidecar. To get your motor running, click here to read a transcript of the interview.

The Daughter's of the American Revolution's Tracy Robinson, and
the "re-chickenization" of France

 

Chicken button

In August 3rd's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 83, Tracy Robinson from the Daughters of the American Revolution joined host Theo Mayer to discuss the contributions of the DAR during the Great War, including the aptly named "re-chickenization" of France, part of the work that the DAR took on for post-war Europe. And the work was something to crow about!  (We're just trying to egg you on to click here to read a transcript of the interview.)


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Japan in WWI

Episode #84

Highlights:
Japan In WWI

Japan in WWI - Dr. Frederick Dickinson | @02:15

Chaos on the Eastern Front - Mike Shuster | @10:05

The 28th Division: Pennsylvania National Guard doughboys fight - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:50

Great War Channel three month retrospective - Indy Neidell | @20:05

Battle of Amiens Commemoration - Prince William, the Duke of Cambridge & others | @21:50

WW1 War Tech: Dazzle Camouflage | @24:40

Special Report: 1418NOW Dazzle Ship Series - Tamsin Dillon & Emma Enderby | @30:05

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Iowa - Timothy Lane | @38:00

Speaking WWI: The Third Light | @43:50

Dispatch Newsletter: Highlights and Headlines | @45:05

The Buzz: The Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @48:20


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

The Debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans

Many French writers who took part in the  WWII Resistance, known as "The Army of Shadows," did so because they felt they owed a debt to the veterans of WWI. The fighters of the Great War included Jews, Communists, and men from the colonies, all of whom became victims of Nazism in the France they had defended just twenty years prior. This week, WWrite takes a look at WWII writer-resisters like Victor Basch, Albert Camus, Jean Moulin, and Louis Aragon, and the ways their written work and their battle against the Nazis were inspired by the sacrifices of WWI soldiers. Read this insightful post on the WWI origins of the French Resistance against the Nazis.


Doughboy MIA for week of August 13

Corporal Charles W. Thompson

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Charles W. Thompson. The son of John F. and Rose Thompson, Charles was born May 29th, 1887, in Sparksville, Indiana. Corporal Thompson was a farmer when he enlisted in the regular army on March 9th, 1915 at Brownstown, Indiana. Assigned to Company H of the 16th Infantry he went to El Paso, Texas during the border crisis. He then went to France with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917. In France he was assigned to Company B, 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, 1st Division and with them was in the Lorraine Sector, Toul Sector, Picardy and the Battle of Cantigny. He was killed in action on July 19th, 1918 at Soissons. Nothing else is known of his case at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Window decal

U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated to help build the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. You can lend your support, and help promote the efforts, by showcasing this custom window decal.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Walter Verlin Dial

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Walter Verlin Dial


Submitted by: Benjamin Lee Woodard 

Walter Verlin Dial born around 1894, Walter Dial served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service 

Walter Verlin Dial was a graduate of Huntington High School, an employee of Huntington Hardware Company, and Scoutmaster of Huntington’s Boy Scout Troop No. 4.

 

He entered service on May 10, 1917, for the first Officers’ Training School at Fort Benjamin Harrison. He was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Cavalry (but transferred to the Machine Gun service) and volunteered for immediate overseas service, leaving Huntington in August and sailing for France Sep 11, 1917 on the MONGOLIA.

Read Walter Verlin Dial's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 7, 2018 

Bells of Peace gaining new participants nationwide for 11/11/18 observance

Bells of Peace logo vertical

More than sixty community participants have already joined the US World War I Centennial Commission’s initiative, “Bells of Peace”. Americans across the nation will toll bells on November 11, 2018 at 11:00 AM, in honor of the service and sacrifice of the nation’s World War I veterans, led by tolling at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. Joining the national bell tolling is an easy way for you to honor those who fought and died in World War I, and to learn about the Commission’s mission to build a World War I memorial in Washington DC. The Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, started tolling bells in 2014, and we are proud to link our efforts with theirs. Read more about how you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.


US Mint reopens sales of World War I Centennial Silver Medal and coin sets

 

Medals

Collectors can again order the five 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and Medal Sets. Limited to 100,000, the sets launched on Jan. 17 and originally had an ordering deadline of Feb. 20. As reported in Coin World, The United States Mint reopened sales of all five sets at their initial issue price of $99.95 each. There’s no word on how many sets are available or for how long their sales will continue. The medals feature designs emblematic of the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard. Conceived by the U.S. Mint to support the WWI Centennial Silver Dollar Commemorative Coin Program, each medal is paired with a proof WWI dollar and sold as a distinct set. Find out more about this new (and probably last!) opportunity to buy these distinctive and historic commemorative medal and coin sets direct from the United States Mint here.


National World War I Memorial Design Team Gets Green Light from CFA in DC

Memorial snip

The Epoch Times newspaper web site has published an extensive followup article covering the June 19 unanimous approval of the design concept for a new National World War I Memorial by the Washington, DC Commission of Fine Arts (CFA). According to the paper, the CFA approval "marked a breakthrough not only for the World War I monument to be realized, but also for the public presence of figurative art on the world stage." Read the entire thoughtful article by The Epoch Times' Milene Fernandez here.


Purple Heart medal has direct connection to American WWI military experience

Purple Heart

Although the Purple Heart is one of the most recognizable medals the US military offers to men and women in its service, the actual story of the decoration is often overlooked. Some 1.9 million purple hearts have been awarded, but many may be surprised to learn that although its conception began with George Washington himself, the Purple Heart in its current form can only be traced back to 1932, with a direct connection to the American military experience in World War I.  WW1CC intern Aaron Rosenthal takes a look at the story of the modern Purple Heart medal and its WW1 roots here.


Centennial of the WWI combat death of beloved American poet Joyce Kilmer

Joyce Kilmer

Beloved American poet Joyce Kilmer was killed 100 years ago on July 30, 1918, while fighting in France. Kilmer is best known for a poem entitled "Trees," published in a collection entitled Trees and Other Poems (1914). At the time of his death, Kilmer was considered to be one of the leading poets and lecturers of his generation. Kilmer joined the Army soon after the U.S. declared war on Germany in April 1917, but he didn’t have to. At the age of 30 he was older than most, plus he was married with children. But he felt he needed to take part. Read more about the life and tragic death of an American literary icon here.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

The Ambulance in World War I

Ambulance

The major theme for July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 82, was the Ambulance: the experience of Americans who drove one, its effect on battlefield medicine, and even the evolution of the word. In 100 Years Ago, host Theo Mayer provided essential background information on the American Field Service (AFS). Nicole Milano, an archivist and editor at the AFS, joined the show to discuss the vital contributions of that organization during the war. In addition, we combined Speaking WW1 and War Tech into one cohesive, ambulance-focused segment. Click here to read a transcript of 100 Years ago, the interview, Speaking WW1, and War Tech.

Rebekah Wilson and the making of the "Turning the Tide" USPS WWI Stamp

Rebekah WIlson

The U.S. Postal Service recently issued  the new World War I "Turning the Tide" Stamp to help commemorate the centennial of WWI. In July 27th’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 82, former World War I Centennial Commission Director of Operations Rebekah Wilson came on the show to share the story behind  the grassroots campaign for the stamp that started at the fledgling U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's very first official meeting on October 29th, 2013. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Corporal Roy Holtz, US Army: First man entering Germany as he rides a Harley-Davidson motorcycle on 11/12/18

Episode #83
Highlights:

August 1918 Preview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @02:05

Great War Project Blog: Turning Point - Mike Shuster | @17:35

International Report 1: Commemorations in France | @21:55

International Report 2: The Moore Twins step up | @22:58

Remembering Veterans: Rechickenization of France - Tracy Robinson DAR | @25:00

Harley Davidson in WWI - Bill Jackson | @31:20

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Dunmore, PA - Jim Davenport & Louise McLafferty | @37:05

Speaking WWI: Stormtrooper | @43:00

WWI WarTech: Stainless Steel | @45:45

Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @48:50

The Buzz: Commemoration in social media - Katherine Akey | @52:55


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Sgt. Frank Carbaugh's 1918 Poem "The Fields of the Marne"

In August 1918, the tide started to turn towards the end of WWI and so did the subject of WWI poetry. While American Sgt. Frank Carbaugh didn't live to see the Armistice, he immortalized his vision of democracy and peace in his poem "The Fields of the Marne," written while he was in the hospital and published inThe Stars and Stripesclose to his death. This week, WWI poetry expert, Connie Ruzich, returns to WWrite to tell us the compelling story of this brave soldier and unknown poet. Read Connie's compelling post!


Doughboy MIA for week of August 6

Private John Sheridan Minch

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private John Sheridan Minch. Born September 21st, 1901, in Beaver, Ohio, Private Minch was a laborer when he was enlisted in the regular army in October, 1916 at Muskegon, Michigan. Assigned to Company H, 28th Infantry, of what would become the 1st Division, and went to the Mexican Border during the crises there before heading to France with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917. He served with the 1st in the Toul sector, Montdidier Sector and at Cantigny. He was killed in action at Soissons on July 21st, 1918 Nothing else is known at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Mug

White Ceramic WWI Centennial Mug

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can enjoy your favorite beverage in this 15-ounce ceramic mug and honor the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers. On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for this endeavor. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Charles Benjamin Mead

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Charles Benjamin Mead

 

Submitted by: Lola {granddaughter-in-law}

Charles Benjamin Mead served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

MILITARY: Register of Deeds, Wessington Springs, Jerauld County, South Dakota.

Honorable Discharge from the United States Army #5859.

Charles B. Mead 3131541 – Mech Casual Det 324-163 DB Co K 157th Inf.

Said Charles B. Mead was born in Blair, in the State of Nebraska. When enlisted he was 22 7/12 years of age by occupation a carpenter. He had blue eyes, brown, hair, medium complexion, and was 5 feet 9 inches in height.

Following is a production of the handwritten journal Charles Benjamin Mead kept with regard to his military life. The small notebook is in the possession of his daughter, Theone Mead Whitlock, Kalama, WA.

Read Charles Benjamin Mead's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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July 31, 2018

WWI Memorial Charts Path Forward 

Memorial snip

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) web site last week published an in-depth article regarding the approval of the updated design for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC by the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) at its meeting on July 19. The article quotes a number of CFA members of how the changes to the design persuaded the Commission to give unanimous approval. Read the entire extensive ASLA article here.


National Women’s History Museum Suffragettes Walking Tour in DC highlights WWI connections 

Suffragettes sign

The history of Women's Rights in America, and of World War I are directly linked. Now, to help tell that story, there is a new hidden treasure for those who live near Washington DC or for those visiting: a walking tour presented by The National Women’s History Museum is now occurring every other week on Friday and once a month on Saturday. World War I Centennial Commission intern Miranda Halpin took the tour, and provides a list of the top stops that help explain how the Suffragettes supported both their nation at war and the cause of Votes for Women. Read the entire article here.


The Story of a Successful Trouble Maker

Bogart

Born to a wealthy family, and only ever attending private schools for America’s most elite, this young man was a terrible student, uninterested in applying himself in school or in any extra-curricular activities.  Even so, he was bound for Yale University until misbehavior at the end of his high school career removed college as an opportunity.  With no other good option, young Humphrey Bogart joined the US Navy in 1918, and turned his life around while serving in WWI as "an exemplary sailor." In post-war Hollywood, Bogart became an iconic figure. Read more about Humphrey Bogart in the third of our series on Hollywood and WWI here. 


23 Oklahoma bridges being renamed to honor Choctaw WWI and WWII heroes

Oklahombi

The Choctaw Nation made history earlier this year with the dedication of the Joseph Oklahombi World War I Code Talker Bridge in McCurtain County, Oklahoma. The dedication, attended by the Choctaw Tribal Council, tribal members, local city and county and state officials, is the first of 23 bridges being named after the 19 Choctaw Code Talkers from World War I and four from World War II, by the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, the biggest bridge undertaking in the history of the Department. Read more about the Oklahoma recognition of Joseph Oklahombi (pictured at right) and other Choctaw the Code Talkers here.


'Rock of the Marne' Soldiers earn their moniker, turn tide of war in summer 1918

Marne

America's entry into World War I began with a year-long buildup beginning in April 1917. By late spring and early summer of 1918, that buildup was nearly complete. In response, the Germans launched a series of offensives, desperate to defeat the French, British and other allies. One of the final German pushes occurred in the early morning hours of July 15, 1918, in the Champagne-Marne area of northern France, where German assault troops and artillery pounded the U.S. 3rd Division lines. The weight of the attack came against Col. Edmund Butts' 30th Infantry and Col. Ulysses Grant McAlexander's 38th Infantry. Read more about how the men of these units earned the sobriquet "Rock of the Marne" with their heroism here.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Update from the States: An Interview with the Delta Cultural Center's Drew Ulrich

Drew Ulrich

In July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 81, Drew Ulrich, the curator of the Delta Cultural Center in Arkansas, spoke with host Theo Mayer about a new exhibit honoring Delta region residents who served in the Great War. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.

Photography in the Great War

Photography

In July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 81, we focused primarily on photography: its effect on the war, a modern curation project, and even an addition to our vernacular. Corine Reis, a French public historian, spoke with host Theo Mayer about her WW1 photography blog, Waldo Pierce Goes to War. Later in the show, we dug into the importance of photography to military operations and personal photography among soldiers in WW1 Tech, and examined the word "snapshot." Click here to read a transcript of the interview, followed by WW1 Tech and Speaking WW1.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

A. Piatt Andrew and  Stephen Galatti in front of a row of ambulances at the AFS headquarters in Paris

Episode #82
Highlights: Ambulance

100 Years Ago: Ambulance | @02:15

American Field Service - Nicole Milano | @08:15

Great War Channel: Hemingway - Indy Neidell | @15:00

Great War Project: But Paris is safe - Mike Shuster | @16:05

America Emerges: Who’s fighting where - Dr. Edward Lengel | @19:50

Commission News: WWI Commemorative Stamp - Rebekah Wilson | @25:50

State Update: Michigan “Over There” event features the maquette | @33:30

Spotlight on the media: New book: Good War, Great Men - Andrew Capets | @34:35

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Cape May, NJ - Kathleen Wyatt & Harry Bellangy | @39:30

Speaking WWI & WWI War Tech : Ambulance | @45:10

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @50:05

 

The Buzz - Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey | @53:30


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Of the Dreadnoughts by Jeffrey Hess

Dreadnoughts. A baseball team? A guitar? A band? While Navy veteran and writer, Jeffrey Hess was researching the Cold War for his next novel, he came upon information about Dreadnoughts, battleships used during WWI. This week at WWrite, Hess, author of Beachhead, Tushhog, and the short-story collection, Cold War Canoe Club, navigates us through one of the less familiar stories of WWI about the U.S. Navy and its formidable Dreadnoughts. Read this interesting and compelling post about these massive WWI battleships.


Doughboy MIA for week of July 30

Corporal Clarence Hawkins

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Clarence Hawkins. Born August 17th, 1898, Corporal Hawkins was a Miner in Huntingtonburg, Indiana when he was enlisted in the regular army on November 13th, 1916 at Columbus Barracks, Ohio. Assigned to Company C, 28th Infantry, 1st Division, and went to France with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917. He was killed in action by shell fire on May 30th, 1918 during the Battle of Cantigny, America's first planned offensive action of the war, while going over the top for the 4th time. His remains were buried there on the battlefield where he fell, but later were never located.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

US Victory Lapel Pin

U.S. Victory lapel pin

Proudly wearing the World War 1 U.S. Victory lapel pin is a meaningful way to honor the contributions made for our country one hundred years ago. Soldiers received Victory buttons upon their discharge from service in “the Great War”. Hand cast in jeweler’s alloy and hand finished in a satin bronze patina, the design features the star, symbolizing victory, honor and glory; a wreath of evergreen laurel leaves symbolizing triumph over death; and the U.S. insignia, clearly identifying the country served. Measures 1” diameter. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Henry Christian Klindt

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Christian Klindt


Submitted by:
Rebecca Nelson {Granddaughter}

Henry Christian Klindt born around 1894, Henry Klindt served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919. 

Story of Service 

Henry C. Klindt served as an “Automatic Man” in WWI, U.S. Army National Guard, Company E, 130th Infantry, 33rd Division from February 26, 1918 to March 21, 1919, arriving in Brest France on May 16, 1918. 

Prompted by his cousins, he wrote about his war experiences in a letter which is attached. He fought in various places in France and his biggest battle was the Argonne Forest Offensive. He was injured when he fell on his knees on railroad tracks but his buddies picked him and he went on. 

The last battle he was gassed, picked up unconscious and carried by his buddies and woke up in a hospital in Vichey France. By the time he got out, the war was over. Somehow he dodged all the shells and bullets sent his way, survived near starvation and the nonstop noise of shelling; being gassed and dealt with not taking his shoes off for 45 days.

Read Henry Christian Klindt's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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