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National World War One Memorial Design Competition

Stage II design concept selections announced

0013 Plaza to the Forgotten War0037 World War One Memorial Concept0077 The Weight of Sacrifice0263 An American Family Portrait0329 Heroes Green

 

 

WASHINGTON, DC (August 19, 2015) -- Five design concepts for the National World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC  have been selected to proceed to Stage II of the design competition. Robert Dalessandro, Chair of the World War One Centennial Commission, announced the selections today.

"This week I am pleased to announce the five design concepts selected by our jury to go forward to the next stage of development for the new World War One Memorial in Pershing Park," Dalessandro said.  Those selected include: "Plaza to the Forgotten War" submitted by Brian Johnsen, AIA; Sebastian Schmaling, AIA, LEEP AP; and Andrew Cesarz, at Johnsen Schmaling Architects, Milwaukee, WI; "World War One Memorial Concept" submitted by Devin Kimmel, Principal at Kimmel Studio, llc in Annapolis, MD"; "The Weight of Sacrifice" submitted by Joseph Weishaar of Chicago, IL; "An American Family Portrait Wall in the Park" submitted by STL Architects in Chicago, IL; and "Heroes' Green" submitted by Maria Counts, of Counts Studio in Brooklyn, NY.

Robert Dalessandro"Thank you to the each of the participants in Stage I of the design competition," said Dalessandro. "The participants provided us all 350+ works of art. Each design concept is an important tribute to the veterans of WW1. We want these artworks to be lasting tributes, as well, so all Stage I submissions will remain available for viewing on our website. They will also become a part of the permanent record of the Centennial Commission.

"Stage I of the design competition was the first step in a long development process," Dalessandro noted. "That process includes many different reviews, designed to bring forward the best possible plan for all parties. These include reviews for environmental, cultural, historical, engineering, budgetary, and livability concerns.

"We have partnered closely with stakeholder organizations to listen to as many voices as possible, and to bring forward the best possible plan. We will continue to do so. Those stakeholder partners include, but are not limited to, the National Park Service, the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, and the National Capital Planning Commission," said Dalessandro.

"In Stage II, the Participants will evolve their design concepts for the memorial and present their designs, while fulfilling the requirements set out by our Commission, and by our stakeholder partners. Each design team will be provided with a stipend from the WW1 Centennial Commission, to help with the concept development, and the construction design process.

"We plan to make these developed design concepts public, and to invite the public to make comments on them, as well," said Dalessandro. "We hope to present the final design concept selection of this competition to the full Commission early next year."

The Stage I Report announcing the selections was issued by the Competition Managers in accordance with the Competition Manual. The Report is the official record of Stage I of the Competition describing the competition process to date, the Jury evaluation and analysis, and the Jury recommendation as to those selected to participate in Stage II. The Report also briefly describes how Stage II will be conducted.

Pershing Park overhead with caption2The selected memorial site is Pershing Park, located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets NW.

The public is invited to view all of the Stage One submissions that conformed with the Competition Manual.  Go to the Memorial Design Competition page for more information on how to view the submissions.

The competition is a two-stage design competition. Stage I was an open, international competition -- open to any professionals, university-level students, or any other interested participants. In the first stage, participants submitted narrative and graphic descriptions of a design concept responding to the competition’s design goals. Five submissions from Stage I were selected by the competition jury as finalists, and those entries will be further refined and developed in Stage II.

The jury for both stages of the competition is composed of individuals representing the worlds of government, the military, the arts, and the citizens of Washington DC. The Commission selected the jurors and will have final decision on the selected design, based on the recommendation of the jury. For information on the Memorial and the competition, including the Competition Manual, and questions and answers from participants, visit the Memorial Design Competition page.

The Memorial will be built using funds raised from the American public. "Please remember that even if we get the perfect design we can’t build the memorial without support," said Chris Isleib, public affairs officer for the Commission. "We invite you to help us in our goal, to create the new WW1 Memorial using only private donations. The veterans of WW1 earned their own memorial, and we can build it for them." For information on fundraising for the Memorial, or to make a donation, visit the Memorial Fundraising page.

National World War One Memorial Design Competition

Over 350 Stage I Design Entries Received

WASHINGTON, DC - (Updated August 5, 2015) The deadline for entries for Stage I of the Design Competition for the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC passed on Tuesday July 21, at 3:00 p.m. EDT, with over 350 entries submitted.

Pershing Park Satellite View

The selected memorial site is Pershing Park, located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets NW.

"Special thank you to those who submitted designs for our WW1 Memorial Design Competition!" said Chris Isleib, Director of Public Affairs for the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission. "The support for this open competition has been overwhelming, with over 350 projects sent in.

"The jury review process of the design concepts for our World War One Memorial competition will continue for a few more days. As announced earlier, the response to the competition has been strong, with over 350 people participating, from all over the world, from many different backgrounds. The public comment participation has also been strong, with over 700 comments submitted, for the jury to consider.

"We plan to announce the names of the competition finalist designers in the coming days. These finalists will compete in the second stage, and the winner will be selected from one of those designs."

 

Read more: Over 350 Entries in World War One Memorial Design Competition

Celebrating the 4th of July during World War I

The day the Stars and Stripes flew from Victoria tower 

US Troops in Perth Scotland 1918 cutlineBy Stuart Irwin

The Fourth of July holiday is an occasion for the United States of America to celebrate and commemorate the birth of the nation. It is interesting to recall how this holiday was celebrated during the years America participated in World War One. The entry of the United States into the war provided a massive boost to the Allied powers and marked a significant moment in the conflict.

Unsurprisingly, therefore, the July 4 holiday excited much interest among the Allied powers. In 1917, The Times newspaper, in London, claimed that ‘[t]here have been many memorable Fourths of July in the past one hundred and forty-one years, but never one so pregnant with the drama of great events as this’. For example, by the order of the King, the stars and stripes flew from Victoria tower.

Read more: How they celebrated July 4th During WWI

Centennial of RMS Lusitania sinking marked by Commission with May 7 events in New York and Washington, DC

On Thursday, May 7th, 2015, the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission will host two commemorative events to honor the 100th anniversary of the tragic sinking of the RMS Lusitania in 1915. Both events are free and open to the public.

In New York City, at 10 a.m. EDT, there will be a wreath-laying ceremony at Pier A in Battery Park, with honored guests and descendants of Lusitania passengers. The location is symbolic, as it houses the first dedicated memorial to World War One in the United States. Further, the location overlooks the Statue of Liberty, and is not far from Pier 54, where the RMS Lusitania departed on her final voyage one hundred years ago.

In Washington, DC, at 6:30 p.m. EDT, the Commission will host a panel discussion with noted historians at the National Press Club. The panel will include: John Maxwell Hamilton from Louisiana State University, a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Professor Richard Striner from Washington College, an expert on President Wilson; and RADM Samuel Cox (USN, Retired), the Director of the U.S. Navy History and Heritage Command. The panel will be moderated by noted national correspondent Gil Klein. Discussion will focus on the wartime role of Lusitania, the worldwide reaction to her tragedy, and the impact of Lusitania's sinking on public opinion in the United States.

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July 21 is deadline for Stage I design entries

Less than one week remains for competitors to submit entries for Stage I of the Design Competition for the National World War One Memorial in Washington DC. The deadline for entries is Tuesday July 21.

The selected memorial site is Pershing Park, located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets NW.

The competition is a two-stage design competition, and is an open, international competition -- open to any professionals, university-level students, or any other interested participants.

In the first stage, participants will submit narrative and graphic descriptions of a design concept responding to the competition’s design goals.

Three to five submissions from Stage I will be selected as finalists, and those entries will be further refined and developed in Stage II.

Both stages of the competition will be evaluated by a jury of individuals representing the worlds of government, the military, the arts, and the citizens of Washington DC. The Commission selected the jurors and will have final decision on the selected design, based on the recommendation of the jury.

‘In Flanders Fields' Centennial event May 3 in DC

Flanders Field McCrae 500The Lt. Col. John McCrae, M.D. Fellowship will commemorate the centennial of McCrae's timeless poem "In Flanders Fields" at noon on Sunday, May 3, 2015 at the DC War Memorial on the National Mall, 1900 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC.

McCrae's poem immortalized the fear and mystery of a life lived in the face of destruction. His clarion call to carry on in the face of all odds has inspired generations to don a poppy pin, a powerful metaphor for the persistence and beauty of life, in memory of the lost.

The commemoration of the poem's centennial is taking place in support of the honored tradition of soldiers in the arts, and remembrance of all lives lost in World War One. Proceedings will begin at noon and will conclude by 1:00 p.m. with Rear Admiral [Ret.] James J. Carey reading the poem and offering remarks.

The Lt. Col. John McCrae, M.D. Fellowship was founded to continue McCrae's dream of the creation of beauty in any and all situations, no matter how dire they appear. The fellowship will pay for retired soldiers to pursue work in the arts and their curation in and around the Washington area. Donation towards the Fellowship's mission may be made at http://www.inflandersfields.org/donate.html.

Evarts Tracy, pioneer of American military camouflage, was renowned architect

By Nancy Piwowar

Plainfield, NJ -- Evarts Tracy was one of the foremost architects in America in 1915, but as World War One came closer to America, he was one of the first men to offer his services to the government. Such patriotism was a family tradition: Tracy was the great-great grandson of Roger Sherman, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and the only one to sign three other historic documents: The Association of 1774, The Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution of the United States.

Tracy was born in New York on May 23, 1868, and moved with his family at the age of six to Plainfield, New Jersey. His parents' house is located on West Eighth Street in the Van Wyck Brooks Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey. He graduated from Yale in 1890.

Tracy married Caroline Streuli on June 23, 1894. In 1900, Evarts Tracy built his own house in Plainfield, New Jersey and occupied it in 1901. Tracy's residence was built perpendicular to the road, and one could surmise that he watched the construction of Muhlenberg Hospital from his residence on Hillside Avenue, which is on a hill overlooking Muhlenberg. His residence was also built to the points of the compass just like his Muhlenberg buildings. Tracy's residence is now part of the Hillside Avenue Historic District, Plainfield, New Jersey.

battlefield camouflage Earlier in 1896, Tracy designed a Nurses' Home for the "old" Muhlenberg in the west end of Plainfield, and it was completed in 1897 (now demolished).

Tracy was into the latest inventions of his time. He purchased a locomobile, "Best Built Car in America," and it was expensive and elegant. He thought so much of his locomobile that the architectural plans of his Hillside Avenue residence shows that he designed a large locomobile opening and door so that he could drive his locomobile right into the basement of his house. This no longer exists at the residence. He enjoyed giving rides to people around the city in his locomobile.

References are made that Tracy retired from the Tracy and Swartwout architectural firm in 1915, but in actuality he offered his services to the country in the Great World War.

Read more: Evarts Tracy

Documenting the First Modern War 100 Years Ago

Sturtevant Read 1917By Darroch Greer

In 2007, a friend of mine from college called me after seeing a photograph of his grandfather on a cover of a book about World War One aviation. He asked me how to make a documentary. Ron King is the grandson of First Yale Unit member John Vorys (Yale 1918, ten-term congressman from Ohio), and his grandfather was sitting next to six classmates in Palm Beach Florida on the cover of a book called The Millionaires' Unit by Marc Wortman (Public Affairs, 2006). The photo was taken in April 1917, and the Yale students had left school to train as pilots in more hospitable weather ten days before the United States declared war on Germany. The Yale Unit became the founding squadron of the U.S. Navy Air Reserve.

Having done most of my documentary work in 19th century American history, I didn't have a strong frame of reference for the Great War. It wasn't touched on at all in secondary school, and my college degree had been in fine arts. Ron attended a talk by the book's author at the Yale Club in Manhattan, and it seemed there might be some unique photos in private family collections. The story was a good one: young, dynamic personalities tackling a new and dangerous technology, running off to war at a time when it seemed romantic.

Read more: Darroch Greer -- The Millionaires' Unit

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