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Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Memorial Hunters Club

We are building a US WW1 Memorial register through a program called the Memorials Hunters Club. If you locate a memorial that is not on the map we invite you to upload your treasure to be permanently archived in the national register.  You can include your choice of your real name, nickname or team name as the explorers who added that memorial to the register. We even have room for a selfie! Check the map, and if you don't see the your memorial CLICK THE LINK TO ADD IT.

100 Cities - 100 Memorials

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  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
101 South Dixon St
76240 Gainesville
TX
USA

This is the 4th Cooke County Court House, it was built in 1910.

To quote the historical marker on the Court House grounds: “The impressive brick and limestone building features terra cotta ornamentation, eagle brackets, and a copper clad dome.  Clocks were added to the dome in 1920 as a World War I memorial.”

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Paul Sullivan
County Road 29
35151 Sylacauga
AL
USA

I found the memorial by accident while was out grave hunting for a WW I veterans grave. This memorial is unique in that it names two recipients of the Distinguished Service Cross from this very rural Alabama County one each from WW I and WW II.


33, 07,1230 N
86,18,4058 W

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Virginia Drye
29 Cornish Stage Rd
03745 Cornish
NH
USA

This Honor Roll is in front of the United Church of Cornish in the park dedicated to all Cornish Veterans though peace and war.
One of the names on the Roll is Homer Saint- Gaudens , the son of Augustus Saint- Gaudens the sculptor.

Location:

  • Flagpole on granite base
  • Flagpole
  • Corporal Walter J. Fufido Post No. 38 of American Veterans
  • Dedication Date: 1955
  • 1955
  • Depth: 8'10
  • Width: 2'11
Spofford and Longwood Avenues, Tiffany Street
Bronx
NY
USA

Side one

FREEDOM 
IN HONOR OF ALL 
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES 
TO PRESERVE OUR NATION 

ERECTED BY 
CPL. WALTER J. FUFIDIO 
POST 38 OF AMVETS 
1955 


Side two

WORLD WAR II 


Side three

KOREA 
VIET NAM 

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: thewanderer
  • 2015
Anderson University, Thrift Library
29621 Anderson
SC
USA

On Veterans Day 2015, a special monument dedication was held at Anderson University to celebrate Corporal Freddie Stowers, the first African-American from South Carolina to receive the Medal of Honor for his service in World War I.

He served in World War I in the Ardennes region of France and was killed in action. He posthumously received the Medal of Honor in 1991.

  • Geo. H. Noll & Son, Brooklyn, NY
  • Column or pillar
  • Oxford Civic Association
  • Dedication Date: 1929
  • 1929
Alice In Wonderland Statue
E 74th St
10021 New York
NY
USA

Main plaque:
ERECTED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE / OXFORD CIVIC ASSOCIATION, INC. / AND FRIENDS OF THE BOYS / WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE / IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR 1917-1918 / ERECTED 1929 / 

Small name plaques:
GEORGE J. WELLBROCK / THOMAS HURLEY / JAMES G. GAFFNEY / LAWRENCE F. CONDON / HERMAN SELNER / VALENTINE E. GROSS /

Small plaque at bottom:
GEO. H. NOLL & SON / MEMORIALS / BROOKLYN, N.Y. /

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: American Legion Post 54
33 Throckmorten Street
07728 Freehold
NJ
USA

Corporal James A. Gere was the first soldier from Freehold killed in WW1. He was killed in action at Chateau Thierry France on August 30, 1918. The monument was dedicated on 11/11/1928.

  • Tree marker
  • Plaque or tablet
Forest Park
Queens
NY
USA

THIS TREE IS DEDICATED TO / THE MEMORY OF / CORP. ROBERT GRAY / CO. L. 106TH INFANTRY / WHO DIED IN THE WORLD WAR / 1914-1918 /

1265 Snelling Ave. N., St. Paul, MN 55108-3099
55108-3099 St Paul
MN
USA

To honor the Minnesotans who, along with their brothers in arms in the U.S. armed forces, helped bring an end to the epic tragedy of World War I.

  • Dedication Date: November 11, 2004
521 E 3 Notch St
36420 Andalusia
AL
USA
North High Street and Ingle Road
45318 Covington
OH
USA

In every war since the founding of this country, citizens of Newbury Township have served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America

Many Covington-area servicemen in World War I joined Company A 3rd Infantry Regiment Ohio National Guard at the Armory in Covington. On September 15, 1917, that unit became the 145th Infantry Regiment 37th Infantry Division (the “Buckeye” Division) of the U. S. Army. This Regiment fought in major battles in France and Belgium, and suffered heavy casualties.

Two soldiers from Covington were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross by the President of the United States for ”Extraordinary Heroism in action” during the war. First Sergeant Luther J. Langston and Major William L. Marlin Commander of the 3rd Battalion of the 145th Infantry Regiment. Both are buried in this cemetery. 

The inscription on the memorial reads:

"IN MEMORY OF THE COVINGTON AREA SERVICEMEN WHO SERVED OUR COUNTRY IN DEFENSE OF LIBERTY DURING WORLD WAR I"  "THEY SHALL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN"

  • Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch
  • Dedication Date: 1920
Coweta County Courthouse 32 Court Square
30263 Newnan
GA
USA

Decorative brass plaque at the entrance to the old Coweta County Courthouse for those of WW1. Listed are 34 names, including a separate “Colored” listing.

Inscription: “ In honor of the men and women of Coweta County, who served their country in the Great War, for world-wide liberty, and in memory of the following who gave their lives. 1917 - 1919.”

“Erected by the Sara Dickinson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Newnan Georgia 1920.”

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Francis Peck
195 Van Hill Road
37745 Greeneville
TN
USA

This 70-foot flag pole is dedicated to World War I soldier Carl Dana Brandon, born on September 6, 1897 and raised in the Fall Branch community of Greene County, TN. He was the son of Andrew Jerome “Rome” Brandon and Cora May Pierce Brandon. He was also an Uncle to Carl Jerome Brandon, the original Owner & Founder of the Davy Crockett TA Travel Center.

Carl Dana joined the Tennessee Army National Guard in May 1917 shortly after graduating from Fall Branch High School. He advanced to the rank of Corporal later that year and was soon on his way across the Atlantic to the European Theatre of the First World War. He was a member of the 117th Infantry Regiment, 59th Infantry Brigade and the 30th Division. The 30th Division later became known as the Old Hickory Division, named in honor of General, President, and Tennessee native, Andrew Jackson.

During the Battle of Montbrehain on October 8, 1918, Carl Dana was fatally wounded and passed away later that night. He is interred in the Somme American Cemetery in Bony, France.

The current owners of Davy Crockett TA Travel Center, great nephews of Carl Dana, are proud to honor the wish of their late father, Carl Jerome, by dedicating this beautiful 70-foot flag pole to Carl Dana Brandon and to all the other men and women who served in war and peace. 

If you would like to learn more about the late Carl D. Brandon and his full write up,
follow this URL: ETVMA Carl D. Brandon Biography

702 Houston St.
36441 Flomaton
AL
USA
Medal of Honor recipient and one of Gen. Pershing's "Immortal Ten."
300 Main St, Van Buren, AR 72956
72956 Van Buren
AR
USA
No additional information at this time.
47933 Crawfordsville
IN
USA
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
North Osage Ave
74447 Okmulgee
OK
USA

Creek Nation Memorial Circle Warriors Memorial Monument. Located at Creek Nation Headquarters, Okmulgee, OK - North Osage Ave. & Oklahoma Hwy. 56 Loop.

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
1000 OK-56
74447 Okmulgee
OK
USA

Creek Nation Veterans Memorial Museum.  Located at Creek Nation Headquarters, Okmulgee, OK - North Osage Ave. & Oklahoma Hwy. 56 Loop.

700 block Montgomery Highway
36049 Luverne
AL
USA
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Memorial Hunter: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
  • Dedication Date: September 7, 1996
128 E Bennett Ave
80813 Cripple Creek
CO
USA

This memorial honors all United States prisoners of war and missing in action from WW1, WW2, Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf.